Resources for Christians

If you’re a communicator for Christ, as I am, you can find Writing Resources with Christian poets, writers, and pastors in mind on my website.

In addition, I hope you’ll follow these blogs, which I maintain as often as family, church, and book-writing commitments allow:

Bible Prayers
Bible Reviewer
Mary Sayler (in lieu of this site)
Poetry Editor & Poetry
Praise Poems (many of which have been compiled in the book PRAISE! and the forthcoming chapbook, WE: the people under God.)
What the Bible Says About Love

May God bless you and your good work in Christ.

Mary Harwell Sayler, (c) 2017

 

Blog – Mary Harwell Sayler

As the New Year begins, expand your options and improve your writing and publishing success with these tips and helps.

Source: Blog – Mary Harwell Sayler

The Poetry Editor and Poetry: The Best American Poetry, 2016

Edited by Edward Hirsch, this year’s edition of The Best American Poetry, 2016, astronomically abounds with rising stars and a constellation of brilliant poets.

Source: The Poetry Editor and Poetry: The Best American Poetry, 2016

The Poetry Editor and Poetry: Excellent resources for poets ready to excel

This newly updated list of resources can help you enhance the writing, revising, and submitting of your poems to appropriate poetry journals, anthologies, and e-zines. Once you have placed a number of poems with editors of print or online publications, you’ll be better prepared to approach a publisher of poetry chapbooks or books of poems.

Source: The Poetry Editor and Poetry: Excellent resources for poets ready to excel

Resources for poets and writers

A couple of years ago, I posted a list of poetry resources on this page, so this time, I’ll add hotlinks that weren’t included.

If other resources have helped you with your research, writing, revising, marketing, or publishing, feel free to add those in the Comments section below, preferably with the full URL included.

Also, please save this page as a Fav, so you’ll be able to find it again as each hotlink will whisk you away from this site.

Online Poetry and Writing Resources

B-rhymes give you word pairs that almost rhyme, but not quite.

Beginner’s Guide to Successful Blogging shows you how to start a blog to post poems, writings, reviews, or discussions about poetry.

Christian Poet’s Guide to Writing Poetry is the e-book version of the poetry course I wrote and used for years with poets from diverse age groups, backgrounds, and levels of skill.

Dictionary search and reverse dictionary site on OneLook.com helps you search for phrases that begin with key words of interest.

English Grammar website gives you grammar rules, online exercises, and writing tips. Similar sites can be found, but I found this one to be especially clear and easy to navigate.

EServer Poetry Collection provides poems by well-known poets writing in English.

New Pages site guides you to literary markets to read, study, and send your batch of poems.

Open Culture has over 1,000 free online courses, including literature.

Poetry 180, sponsored by the Library of Congress, offers a poem for each day of the school year but to be read anytime too.

Poetry and Literature page, also sponsored by the Library of Congress, gives histories of poetry, interviews with poets, archives of poetry, upcoming events, Poet Laureate bio’s, and more.

Poetry development of your poems or a poetry critique with my one-on-one feedback is available for a minimal fee. Having done this for 30 years, I assure you, I’ll be encouraging but honest and helpful.

Poetry Dictionary For Children and For Fun e-book covers poetry forms and terminology, from A to Z, in what may be the only poetry dictionary for children. I recommend it for classrooms and poets of all ages because it’s a fun way to learn and because I wrote it.

Project Gutenberg brings you the full texts of over 49,000 classical books, including poetry, online at no charge.

Rhyme Zone helps you find definitions of words as well as true rhymes, slant rhymes, and synonyms.

Writing Resources on my website include those mentioned here and in the previous post. If you know of others, I’m eager to find out what helped you to improve your work or what might help other poets to learn about poetry. Thanks.

©2015, Mary Harwell Sayler, writer and reviewer, has 3 books of poems in print: Living in the Nature Poem published by Hiraeth Press and Beach Songs & Wood Chimes (for children) and Outside Eden, published by Kelsay Books.

Read, write, breathe poetry

With National Poetry Month (NaPoMo) rapidly coming to an end, I thought it might be a good time to select past posts that can help you better enjoy the poems you read and also effectively improve your own poems as you revise. During this search, however, I unhappily discovered that my blog host does not provide easy access to posts written before 2012!

Fortunately, basic information on poetry stays the same! So I found hotlinks that still work, as listed below, to give you a broad overview of poetry and the joys and challenges of becoming a published poet.

Since those early days of posting, I changed my website to my name, which means you might find links within an article that no longer work. Also, when Poetry Of Course went out of print with my book publisher, I retained rights to upload an updated version as the Kindle e-book, a Christian Poet’s Guide to Writing Poetry.

Hopefully, these helps will give your poetry writing a boost, but you’re welcome to suggest new topics in the Comments section below.

How to Read a Poem

Scan A Poem. Get The Picture.

Going Postal with Poetry

Rhyme, rhythm, and reality: traditional English verse

Start your New Year with new tools for writing & revising poems

What kinds of poems fit you?

How do you know a poem is ready?

Do real poets read and write prose poems?

Breaking line with free verse

Line breaks can make or break your poem

Scan a poem. Catch the beat. Change the rhythm as you revise.

Poetry forms help re-form a poem as you revise

National Poetry Month and the 3 Rs

Poets and poems to celebrate during National Poetry Month

Poets who shaped poetry – good reading for NaPoMo & beyond

How to write haiku

Revising your poetry can be a smooth move.

Poetry Revision: Less can bring more to a poem

Three techniques for revising your poems

Unlocking clockwork rhyme

Villanelles need something worth repeating

Sonnets traditionally require poets to use rhythmic rhymes and argue nicely in fourteen lines

That Punctual Punctuation (Anyway) How

Resolutions for sober poets in the New Year

©2015 Mary Harwell Sayler, all rights reserved. For more poetry resources or a one-on-one critique of your poetry book, chapbook, or batch of poems for a minimal fee, visit Mary’s website.

THE Market guide for poets

The 2015 Poet’s Market guide published by Writer’s Digest Books is THE book for poets who want their poems to be traditionally published. Like previous editions I’ve purchased over the years, the review copy that WD kindly sent me contains a wide range of articles in these key categories:

• Business of Poetry (getting organized, avoiding common mistakes, etc.)

• Promotion of Poetry (articles on platforms, blogs, readings, and more)

• Poet Interviews (with well-published poets offering insights into writing)

• Craft of Poetry (form, rhyme, meter, writing prompts, revision, and more)

• Poems (about poetry or being a poet)

• Markets (lists of magazines/journals, book/chapbook publishers, contests, awards, and grants)

• Resources (conferences, workshops, poetry festivals, poetry organizations, A to Z glossary of poetry terminology, and more)

• Indexes (subjects covered in poetry publications and a general A to Z index of publishers)

In the opening article “From The Editor,” Robert Lee Brewer assures us that this edition has even more listings of poetry publishers and contests than last year’s market guide. So, naturally, I had to flip ahead to the second half of this book where I immediately noticed new-to-me names of publishers of poetry books and chapbooks as well as journals I haven’t yet read. Such “finds” are worth the whole book!

Before drooling too long over those publishing contacts, however, reading the article “How To Use Poet’s Market” will prepare you and your poems for the submission process with these preliminary steps:

1. Be an avid reader.

2. Know what you like to write – and what you write best.

3. Learn the “business” of poetry publishing.

4. Research the markets.

5. Start slowly (as in, don’t rush into print!)

6. Be professional.

7. Keep track of your submissions.

8. Don’t fear rejection. Learn from it.

To give a glimpse of what they’ve learned, well-published poets and poetry instructors wrote informative articles for the book on everything from punctuating and formatting a poem to writing in form, working with editors, promoting a new book, and giving a poetry reading.

Not only does the book intersperse articles with interesting interviews, the guide includes a section of poems about reading poetry, writing poems, and “How To Break Up With A Poem” that just isn’t coming together!

Although I’ve been writing poems forever and getting published for quite a while, the front half of the book gave me refreshing perspectives on being a poet and a great refresher on poetry techniques.

Whenever I buy the book, however, I do so to expand my potential markets and see publishers’ updates and current needs. Occasionally “Tips” such as “We like how-to articles” are added, but mainly, the format includes each publisher’s name with the mail and e-mail addresses, the name of the editor to contact, a statement about the company’s practices, and immediate “Needs,” including preferences, length requirements, and topics to avoid.

Read and heed those needs!

If a periodical asks you not to stuff a #10 envelope with 10 or more poems, then stuffeth thou not!

If they say, “We like carefully crafted poems,” that means showing craft not a first draft!

But, even if you think you don’t know what a publisher’s preferences mean, you will if you simply look up unfamiliar terms in the A to Z glossary provided, then give yourself and your poems whatever time you need.

© 2014, Mary Harwell Sayler has placed hundreds of poems and 27 traditionally published books in all genres. Her e-book, the Christian Poet’s Guide to Writing Poetry, is a revision of the poetry home study course she wrote and used for years with other poets and poetry students, and she continues to offer one-on-one feedback for a minimal fee through her website.

2015 Poet’s Market guide, paperback

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